Forums Flags on the 48 Information General Discussion Two-Way radios

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  • Z-man
    Post count: 27
    #47562 |

    Any suggestions? And did I read correctly that I need to get an FCC license for them? 😕

    Just starting to check them out, and spotted this one, that looks good…

    http://direct.motorola.com/ENS/web_producthome_T6500R.asp?Country=USA&language=ENS

    Thanks in advance for any input :beer:

    MichaelJ
    Participant
    Post count: 839

    Radio models that use GMRS (General Mobile Radio Service) do in fact require an FCC license.
    An FRS (Family Radio Service)-only radio does not.

    Z-man
    Post count: 27

    interesting…I am going to have to look into that… and how to get one. I think I read it was like $75 for 5 year license.

    MichaelJ
    Participant
    Post count: 839

    I’ve heard good things about GMRS radios compared to the FRS radios, especially for uses like keeping a group together while at a ski area. If you’re going to use them a lot, it’s probably worth it.

    MichaelJ
    Participant
    Post count: 839

    BTW, you can get FCC licenses online. My understanding is that you just need form 605 for a GMRS radio, but the research is left as an exercise for the reader. 😀

    DiamondRidge
    Post count: 3

    been using the two-ways for a long time (both at work and at play) and have yet to have the radio police knock down my door for not having a license… just saying… 😉

    TrekMan
    Participant
    Post count: 149

    These radios are very common at ski areas … how better to connect with the kids at lunchtime. I don’t think many are FCC registered. I have a pair and they work pretty good … but on a big ski area with several faces, they don’t go several miles AND around ridges too.

    TrekMan
    Participant
    Post count: 149

    Here is what I found at the FCC website:
    If you operate a radio that has been approved exclusively under the rules that apply to FRS, you are not required to have a license. FRS radios have a maximum power of ½ watt (500 milliwatt) effective radiated power and integral (non-detachable) antennas. If you operate a radio under the rules that apply to GMRS, you must have a GMRS license. GMRS radios generally transmit at higher power levels (1 to 5 watts is typical) and may have detachable antennas.

    Licensing
    Before any station transmits on any channel authorized in the GMRS from any point within or over the territorial limits of any area where the FCC regulates radio services, the responsible party must obtain a license. The FCC usually grants GMRS system licenses for a five-year term. To apply for a GMRS system license, you may file online through the Universal Licensing System (ULS), or file FCC Form 605 manually. New filers can learn more about ULS in its getting started tutorials. See Fee Requirements for FCC Form 605 (pdf) for current licensing fee information.

    Poking around some more I see $85 mentioned as the 5-year fee.

    BobMcCue
    Post count: 8

    I have used them on hikes and at large ski areas. Radio waves do not bend around mountains, if your group has alot of vertical interference, you will not be able to raise them on the radio. They are good for comunicating between vehicles or if the group is not spread apart too much. Just am FYI to use caution incorporating these into plans.

    MichaelJ
    Participant
    Post count: 839

    Last fall I bought a pair of Midlands and used them while skiing. In some areas I had great success and they were very helpful. In others, I had the most bizarre results: I could hear the person calling me crystal-clear, but they could not hear my response. This happened in several different geographic situations and I don’t know why. The radios were on the same FRS channel and using the same regular tone squelch (not one of the newer digital squelches).

    Other than those two situations, which admittedly led to much grief, they worked wonderfully and were very helpful, especially skiing out west in Utah where there was a lot of open space to a) get separated, and 2) pass radio waves through.

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