Forums Flags on the 48 Information General Discussion Reports from the 48 Flagsites!

Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 40 total)
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  • Tom C
    Post count: 1

    Caught up with Jayne K, Cheryl M and Bob R et al, flying the colors on Mt. Moosilauke. I hiked up with Rick R, Ron C and Pete S.(The Trammy) and saw the colors as we crossed over the last ridge. An awesome and wonderful sight. Sorry to say that we could not see any other flags due to the distance and haze.

    Met up with some other flag wavers from N. Hancock, S. Hancock, Eisenhower, Garfield, Cannon and Jackson at the Woodstock Inn. The spirit was strong and I’m glad I was able to be a part of it.

    God Bless the United States of America
    We will never forget!
    Tom C. (Moosilauke)

    Greg
    Post count: 397

    Hello all! We, too, had a wonderful day. My brother David and I left the basecamp at the Bluff in the Great Gulf at 8:30 AM and reached the Madison Gulf headwall at about 10:30. It certainly was a challenge scaling Mad Gulf, especially with frame packs with five foot sections of antenna which would become our flagpole. We filled up with water at the hut and then made our way up the Madison summit come. I was pretty tired and running on fumes but was determined to get the flag raised as close to noon as possible.

    Right around noon we reached the summit and the flag was raised soon after. A man and his young son (who checked another off his peakbagging list) asked about the flag and we let them know about the event. Two other woman came by and we told them about the event. They seemed very excited and asked if we’d take pictures of them by the flag. We chatted with a few other folks, including a WMNF ranger. He said he saw us coming up the summit and couldn’t imagine what the poles were for!

    He indicated that last year they had to remove a lot of flags that we left behind and we indicated our LNT intention. He seemed relieved and even knew about the flag that Gail and company raised on Liberty last year. I told him that was the inspiration for this event.

    Shortly before 1 PM Joe made it to the summit from Dolly Copp (via Pine Link/Howker Ridge). K and Mike D soon followed. A lot of people were on the summit enjoying lunch, the flag, and the weather. A number of people took pictures with the flag. Adams was in and out of the clouds most of the time, but we were not able to see a flag on the summit, even with binoculars. It was pretty hazy and we couldn’t see one on Washington amongst all the summit buildings.

    We took the flag down shortly before 2 PM and made our way down Osgood Ridge to camp, while the others descended to Dolly Copp. Joe offered to take the poles with him which was a huge help. A great day, and worthwhile experience. We were glad to be a part of it.

    Max – The flag was small (3′ x 5′) but was raised proudly for almost 2 full hours. It was on the north side of the summit cone.

    rltustin
    Post count: 1

    What a great day for a hike up Mt Carrigan. My thanks to Bob (maine guy) for including us as his partners in raising our flag. Our crew of my wife Ges, Bob, Geri, Cody and Bob raised a 6×10 foot flag which proudly flew until 2pm.

    It was a pleasure to see the enthusiasm of the other hikers we met at the top.

    My hats off to Cody who is about to turn 9 as he completed his 9th 4000 footer with this hike and Ges who hiked despite feeling a little under the weather and our close friend Bob and Geri who got us hooked on the 4000 footers. And to all the hikers who made the day a memorable event.

    Max
    Post count: 40

    Yep, that was it Greg. We could see something on the north shoulder, but it was so hazy and it was hard to hold the binoculars steady. They were a cheap pair also. And my eyes aren’t getting any younger! And we didn’t see anything on Adams either, nor Jefferson for that matter.

    Max

    MichaelJ
    Participant
    Post count: 839

    I knew it was going to be a rough hike when I woke up Saturday morning coughing and sneezing. Nonetheless, I met up with Max at the 19-Mile Brook trailhead and off we went. No need to really recap what he’s already said – we got that flag 20′ up in the air and the wind shot it out straight for two hours. It was a powerful scene.

    Unfortunately, because of the scrub on the Dome, plus the cloud ceiling which we were almost above at times, we weren’t able to see any other flags, though Greg, yes, I do believe that Max and I could just barely make out your flag on Madison.

    A number of folks came by who didn’t know about Flags, and were very thrilled and moved to find out. I feel bad for the three that all did know, wanted to be there, and showed up just after we took it down.

    It was terrific to meet SherpaK, Gail, and the rest of the gang, and I regret not joining everyone in Woodstock, but the cold was really getting the best of me and I needed to take the 3-1/2 hour drive home while I was still conscious. As it’s been said, huge thanks to the organizers of this event, and I’ll be submitting my photos once I go through them and pick out the best. For now, I temporarily put up three good ones here,
    here, and here.

    LOMU
    Post count: 26

    The start of our hike was right on schedule at 940 hrs until I realized my hydration pack was leaking. False alarm! It was only too full and leaking out of the cap. The hike up was warmer than anticipated and relatively straight up. This was a really nice day, sunny with occasional breezes and practically no bugs. I split the load of the flagpole with my buddy James and we made it to the summit at about 1120 hrs. It worked out perfect not too heavy with out any sacrifice of rigidity. Dan, James and myself flew our flags right on time at 1200 hrs. The two choices of flags were of course Old Glory and a POW-MIA flag. The turn out was about 30/70; meaning about 30% out of all the persons at the summit knew why we were there. The remaining percentages were intrigued and appreciative of our efforts and for the most part expressed this to us sincerely. This was an event that has lived up to my all my positive anticipations, minus smelling like Gatorade. I thank everyone who took part, supported or contributed to this event as a whole. I hope it went as well for everyone else as it did for me and to the victims for which we made this effort for ‘You Are Not Forgotten’.

    Greg
    Post count: 397

    @MichaelJ wrote:

    …I’ll be submitting my photos once I go through them and pick out the best. For now, I temporarily put up three good ones here,
    here, and here.

    That is AWESOME! You and Max definitely win the best flagpole award so far. You guys are insane! 😆

    Please submit some to the Flags on the 48! Image Gallery.

    SuperDave
    Post count: 3

    Well, better late than never. I’d never hiked Adams before, and I chose to ascend via the King Ravine trail. What a hike! 😀 I had a great time, but it was pretty tough on my hiking partner. Our 8:30 start turned into a 9:00 start, and our 3.5 hour hike turned into 4.5 hours…by the time I reached the summit, it was just after 1:30 (Stephanie didn’t ascend the summit with me…by the time we’d reached the junction of King Ravine and Airline, she’d had enough and waited there for my return).

    Once there, I raised my flag on an 8′ pole for about an hour. I received nothing but positive comments, and several people asked me to take their picture with it. It’s truly been an honor to be a part of this event…thanks to all who helped to make it possible.

    Dave

    Greg
    Post count: 397

    @SuperDave wrote:

    Well, better late than never. I’d never hiked Adams before, and I chose to ascend via the King Ravine trail. What a hike! 😀 I had a great time, but it was pretty tough on my hiking partner. Our 8:30 start turned into a 9:00 start, and our 3.5 hour hike turned into 4.5 hours…by the time I reached the summit, it was just after 1:30 (Stephanie didn’t ascend the summit with me…by the time we’d reached the junction of King Ravine and Airline, she’d had enough and waited there for my return).

    Once there, I raised my flag on an 8′ pole for about an hour. I received nothing but positive comments, and several people asked me to take their picture with it. It’s truly been an honor to be a part of this event…thanks to all who helped to make it possible.

    Dave

    Hi Dave. Did you see our flag on Madison? Were you directly on the summit? We kept looking for a flag but didn’t see one, but big ‘ole Adams was in the clouds much of the day…

    Little Bear
    Post count: 17

    I am so honored to have been a part of this incredible event. Our flag was huge!!! (Thanks Frodo.) I have never been overly moved by the sight of the American flag, but when we got this one up and flying….well…it was a pretty emotional moment.

    As much as I like summits without any structures, etc., I have to admit, the US flag is meant to be flown from mountaintops. What a sight. We were able to see flags on Jackson and Monroe (finally, when the clouds cleared). That flag pole on Monroe was really tall – you could see it without binoculars! When we took the flag down, the summit looked really strange and bare.

    We got a couple of interesting comments from some folks. One woman commented, “Gee, I don’t remember this flag when I was up here in July.” and another man said “Wow, this flag’s in good shape – it’s not frayed or anything.”

    I’d say we had only positive comments from hikers on Saturday. The flag was definitely the focus of lots of photo ops.

    To everyone who helped to organize this event – THANKS!!!! We must never forget the events of 9-11 or those who died on that day. (It really makes you take stock of what is truly important in life.)

    Reflect….Honor…..Remember…..

    Count me in for next year!

    Little Bear

    Al
    Post count: 7

    Myself, Tom, Doug, Ashli, Sarah, Carol, Tim, Becky and of course the Bear got sort of a late start. We were intending to leave the trailhead at 6:00, and hike the Osseo Trail to the summit of Mt. Flume, which according to the WMG takes 4H 25M. We did not hit the trail until 7:35, but still made it to the summit in under 4 hours! I guess we were motivated to be on time. We got our pole set up, (22 feet tall, will get pictures scanned and sent this week) but realized we had accidentially knotted the rope that the flag was to be rasied on! :blink: After a quick taking down and unknotting, we had our flag flying at 12:05. It was a hazy day, but we were able to see the flag on Liberty and the one on Bondcliff. Thanks to Tom for designing and carrying most of the flagpole. Congrats to Tim on his first four thousand footer! This was a great event, and all passers by seemed to think so. A few were concerned that the flags were to be left there, but we explained it was a LNT event. We met the guy who flew the flag on Owl’s Head while hiking out on the Lincoln Woods Trail. Hats off to you! 8) Thanks to all who put this together, and good job, everyone! :beer:

    hiker3791
    Post count: 11

    The day couldn’t have been more perfect for the event. My husband and I actually made it to the summit of Garfield about an hour early, we were so anxious to be on time. We had a 5′ x 8′ flag and aluminum poles about 8 or 9 foot high. The first thing we saw was a loop fastened to the foundation of the fire tower and the flag pole would fit right in it!! We thought we had it made. The wind proved to be a bit much for the poles and we thought they would snap. Other hikers already on the summit tried to help us figure something out. We met two men who had just finished the 48 and they were very nice and tried so hard to help. We finally decided the two of us would just take turns holding it. This sounds easier than it was as the wind really whipped it and sometimes it would wrap around us. But it turned out great because as other hikers came over and read the mission statement I had printed and put in a plastic frame, they began to ask if they could give us a break and hold it. One said he would be honored. It was rewarding to see everyone feel part of that great experience and wasn’t solidarity what it was all about? I don’t know how we would have done it without all the wonderful people. Aren’t hikers great? We made it the two hours with no problems. People thanked us and no one seemed to have anything but positive things to say. Most of the people we saw had heard about the event before. We really enjoyed the group at the Inn afterwards. All wanted to share stories. Thanks for letting us be part of this and thanks to all who organized it.

    Greg
    Post count: 397

    Came across this post on the rec.climbing newsgroup and thought I’d share it:

    From: Guido
    Subject: “Flags atop the 48” – TR
    Newsgroups: rec.climbing
    Date: 2002-09-15 05:50:58 PST

    Funny how few coincidences are truly coincidental.

    Weeks ago, I had encountered this effort on the web, off a newsgroup, but
    had let it go once I realized that all the good summits had been
    volunteered.

    The object was to fly a flag atop each of New Hampshire’s 48 four thousand
    footers on Saturday, September 14th in honor of those perished in the WTC
    disaster.

    Saturday morning, Susan and I were packing up at the Cog railway’s
    Marshfield station when, at last option, I tossed my clarinet into the pack
    with thoughts of a quiet summit rehearsal. A mile later up the Ammonoosuc
    trail, I exchange good mornings with a Maine man with 5 foot aluminum poles
    protruding from his pack. And before he could explain the poles, it struck
    me. It was “Flags atop the 48” day, and we were along for the ceremonies!

    Atop Mt. Monroe, as Garret unfurled his 3′ x 5′ old glory, hoisted it atop
    the 15′ mast and guyed it down in the 5-15 mph southerly, I cranked up
    mountainous renditions of Star Spangled Banner and God Bless America. As
    folks wandered across the summit over the noon-to-2 p.m. flag time, funeral
    dirges and blues from the clarinet haunted hikers’ hearts as clouds
    threatened summits everywhere.

    Garret’s high school had lost 19 individuals in the WTC disaster; mostly
    NYPD firemen who responded. He had driven from Kingfield, Maine to honor
    his classmates, to do his due this day.

    The two hours passed like a storm at sea. Day and thru-hikers, 12 Canadians
    and even a family from Dresden paused atop to take it all in. Hikers in the
    Presidential range heading south passed our regards to Eisenhower, and north
    to Washington where other flag raisers resided this day. The naked eye
    could discern flags only atop Eisenhower and Jefferson, and hinted at its
    presence atop Isolation. All others required binoculars and a parting of
    clouds.

    After one more Star Spangled Banner, we sounded taps at 2 p.m. and lowered
    the flag. As we descended and passed upcoming hikers, we thought what a
    different summit Monroe had been for those two hours. A memorial service of
    a high order had been quietly marked, on a smokey overcast day atop a
    founder’s hill. The service left no trace, discernable anyway, on the
    hilltop. But in our hearts and memories, images will last a lifetime.

    G

    Is this the same “Guido” that started this thread?

    SuperDave
    Post count: 3

    @Greg wrote:

    Hi Dave. Did you see our flag on Madison? Were you directly on the summit? We kept looking for a flag but didn’t see one, but big ‘ole Adams was in the clouds much of the day…

    Yup, I saw your flag…it was pretty clear when I first got up there. As I said, I summited later than planned, but my flag was flying directly from the summit by about 1:35 until I headed down at 2:30.

    Greg
    Post count: 397

    Bummer. I wish we looked for it again before we left. I think the last time we looked was prety close to 1:30 PM. Any pics?

Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 40 total)
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